«  

January 2008

  »
S M T W T F S
 
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
31
 
 
 
Venue:
Kelly Writers House, University of Pennsylvania3805 Locust Walk
Philadelphia, PA Map
Price: Free Admission
Thursday, January 31, 2008 - 6:00pm

Howard Mandel's Miles Ornette Cecil: Jazz Beyond Jazz with Jamaaladeen Tecuma

Author Howard Mandel presents three avatars of the avant garde in performance video clips, reading excerpts of his new book Miles Ornette Cecil -- Jazz Beyond Jazz, engaging Ornette Coleman-collaborator Jamaaladenn Tacuma, and inviting audience participation in a discussion of the music and social contexts applicable to iconoclastic artistry from the origins of the musicians' careers to this day. 

Howard Mandel is the author of Miles Ornette Cecil -- Jazz Beyond Jazz (Routledge, 2008) and Future Jazz (Oxford University Press, 1999), senior editor of The Billboard Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz and Blues, senior contributor to Down Beat, arts reporter for National Public Radio, adjunct faculty at New York University, and president of the Jazz Journalists Association. A Chicago native living in New York City since 1982, Mandel has lectured on jazz for the U. S. Department of State, at the New School Jazz and Contemporary Music program, the Guelph Jazz Colloquium of 2007, and elsewhere.

Since his emergence with Ornette Coleman's Prime Time in the mid-1970s, Jamaaladeen Tacuma has been one of the top electric bassists in a style of music that could be called "free funk." Growing up in Philadelphia, Tacuma (who before he converted to Islam was known as Rudy McDaniel) played with Charles Earland. Only 19 when he joined Coleman in 1975, his ability to combine together funky rhythms with free jazz helped give Prime Time its distinctive (if overcrowded) sound. Tacuma's own solo career has been a bit erratic, alternating great moments with throwaway tracks. He also has played with a wide variety of advanced musicians (including James "Blood" Ulmer, Olu Dara, Julius Hemphill, and David Murray).